12- 0347

Add to Lightbox Download
A police car drives through the Fukushima exclusion zone, past banks of overgrown kudzu. This highway connects the abandoned city of Namie, former population 22,000, with Fukushima city and Nihonmatsu, 40 miles west. In Chernobyl, local governments from evacuated towns often just disbanded, leaving their records behind. In Fukushima districts such as Namie, however, the government continues to function in exile. Namie’s offices relocated to a community center in Nihonmatsu, where nearly 100 employees still process records for former residents. <br />
------------------- <br />
This photograph is part the book of Would You Stay?, by Michael Forster Rothbart, published by TED Books in 2013. The photos come from Forster Rothbart’s two long-term documentary photography projects, After Chernobyl and After Fukushima.<br />
© Michael Forster Rothbart 2007-2013.<br />
www.afterchernobyl.com<br />
www.mfrphoto.com • 607-267-4893 • 607-436-2856 <br />
34 Spruce St, Oneonta, NY 13820<br />
86 Three Mile Pond Rd, Vassalboro, ME 04989<br />
info@mfrphoto.com<br />
Photo by: Michael Forster Rothbart<br />
Date:  7/17/2012<br />
File#:  Canon — Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera frame 80347
A police car drives through the Fukushima exclusion zone, past banks of overgrown kudzu. This highway connects the abandoned city of Namie, former population 22,000, with Fukushima city and Nihonmatsu, 40 miles west. In Chernobyl, local governments from evacuated towns often just disbanded, leaving their records behind. In Fukushima districts such as Namie, however, the government continues to function in exile. Namie’s offices relocated to a community center in Nihonmatsu, where nearly...
more »

Filename: 66-68-JP_Fukushima12_80347.JPG
Copyright