08-

Add to Lightbox Download
“The director told me that norms of radiation safety were inoperative. In a place of tremendous economic desperation, people competed for work in the Zone of Exclusion, where salaries were relatively high and steadily paid. Prospective workers engaged in a troubling cost-benefit assessment that went something like this: if I work in the Zone, I lose my health. But I can send my son to law school.”<br />
— Adriana Petryna, anthropologist, in Biological Citizenship<br />
<br />
Sergii Yudin and his wife Irina return home from work at the Chernobyl plant. Sergii is a superintendent in the Heat and Underground Communications shop, Irina is a communications engineer. Their older son Stas also works at Chernobyl.<br />
<br />
Daily life in Slavutych revolves around the power plant’s schedule. In winter, Chernobyl personnel walk to the Slavutych train station each morning before dawn and get back after dark. In the evenings, the stores and streets are full again as the workers arrive home. None of them know how long their jobs will continue or what the city will do once they are laid off. <br />
------------------- <br />
This photograph is part the book of Would You Stay?, by Michael Forster Rothbart, published by TED Books in 2013. The photos come from Forster Rothbart’s two long-term documentary photography projects, After Chernobyl and After Fukushima.<br />
© Michael Forster Rothbart 2007-2013.<br />
www.afterchernobyl.com<br />
www.mfrphoto.com • 607-267-4893 • 607-436-2856<br />
34 Spruce St, Oneonta, NY 13820<br />
86 Three Mile Pond Rd, Vassalboro, ME 04989<br />
info@mfrphoto.com<br />
Photo by: Michael Forster Rothbart<br />
Date:  10/2008    File#:  Canon 5D digital camera frame 50902<br />
------------------- <br />
Original caption:<br />
Slavutych, Ukraine, is the new city built after the Chernobyl accident for evacuees from Pripyat, the abandoned city in the Exclusion Zone. Nearly 4,000 out of the 25,000 inhabitants still work at Chernobyl today, commuting through Belarus on 3 special “elektrichka” trains that depart between 6:30 and 7:30 each
“The director told me that norms of radiation safety were inoperative. In a place of tremendous economic desperation, people competed for work in the Zone of Exclusion, where salaries were relatively high and steadily paid. Prospective workers engaged in a troubling cost-benefit assessment that went something like this: if I work in the Zone, I lose my health. But I can send my son to law school.”
— Adriana Petryna, anthropologist, in Biological Citizenship
more »

Filename: x-08-UA_Slv_peds_Silpo08_50902.TIF
Copyright