12- 1647

Add to Lightbox Download
Every evening after dinner, plumber Masayuki Nagai in Koriyama opens the newspaper and pores over the radiation reports. The average daily dose for each city is monitored by government dosimeters and printed each day in the paper alongside the weather. Masayuki tracks the changes, but at the same time, he doesn’t believe what he reads. “People don’t trust the government numbers,” he says, “unlike the supermarkets, which now report exactly where each food comes from.” People trust the store labels, he believes, because a shop would lose all its customers if they learned they’d been lied to. It’s harder to switch governments than supermarkets.<br />
------------------- <br />
This photograph is part the book of Would You Stay?, by Michael Forster Rothbart, published by TED Books in 2013. The photos come from Forster Rothbart’s two long-term documentary photography projects, After Chernobyl and After Fukushima.<br />
© Michael Forster Rothbart 2007-2013.<br />
www.afterchernobyl.com<br />
www.mfrphoto.com • 607-267-4893 • 607-436-2856 <br />
34 Spruce St, Oneonta, NY 13820<br />
86 Three Mile Pond Rd, Vassalboro, ME 04989<br />
info@mfrphoto.com<br />
Photo by: Michael Forster Rothbart<br />
Date:  7/23/2012<br />
File#:  Canon — Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera frame 81647
Every evening after dinner, plumber Masayuki Nagai in Koriyama opens the newspaper and pores over the radiation reports. The average daily dose for each city is monitored by government dosimeters and printed each day in the paper alongside the weather. Masayuki tracks the changes, but at the same time, he doesn’t believe what he reads. “People don’t trust the government numbers,” he says, “unlike the supermarkets, which now report exactly where each food comes...
more »

Filename: 41-43-JP_Fukushima12_81647c.JPG
Copyright