09- 3534

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Although the Chernobyl accident created a unique opportunity to study radiation, little systematic scientific research is being conducted. Tim Mousseau, of the University of South Carolina, and his team are among the few researchers who return every year. Their findings, some of which are controversial, indicate that many birds, insects, and spiders are absent or in very low numbers in the Chernobyl region. For 25 years, elements such as strontium, cesium, and plutonium have moved through the ecosystem in a process called bioaccumulation. Plants absorb the radioactive particles, then are eaten by herbivores, thus passing the toxic materials up the food chain.<br />
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This photograph is part the book of Would You Stay?, by Michael Forster Rothbart, published by TED Books in 2013. The photos come from Forster Rothbart’s two long-term documentary photography projects, After Chernobyl and After Fukushima.<br />
© Michael Forster Rothbart 2007-2013.<br />
www.afterchernobyl.com<br />
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Photo by: Michael Forster Rothbart<br />
Date:  7/2009    File#:  Canon 5D digital camera frame 73534
Although the Chernobyl accident created a unique opportunity to study radiation, little systematic scientific research is being conducted. Tim Mousseau, of the University of South Carolina, and his team are among the few researchers who return every year. Their findings, some of which are controversial, indicate that many birds, insects, and spiders are absent or in very low numbers in the Chernobyl region. For 25 years, elements such as strontium, cesium, and plutonium have moved through the...
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